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Welcome to the latest news, supporting evidence and clinical viewpoints from guest bloggers about caring@home.

 

Clinical and personal viewpoints

Guest posts by palliative care industry specialists. 

Anticipation of patient needs as end of life approaches
Anticipation of patient needs as end of life approaches

Anticipation of patient needs as end of life approaches

Debbie Kirkup, Nurse Practitioner from Metro South Palliative Care Service in Brisbane, Queensland recounts a recent patient and carer journey using the caring@home resources.  

Evaluation surveys - have your say.
Evaluation surveys - have your say.

Evaluation surveys - have your say.

The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) are working to evaluate the effect of the online education modules and resources on nurses and carers. One way of being a part of the evaluation is to complete the short five-minute survey prior to starting the online modules, and the post-education survey upon completing the modules.

The pre-education and post-education surveys help us understand how to best support you in your clinical practice; your thoughts are important to us.

caring@home joins forces with Shannon's Bridge
caring@home joins forces with Shannon's Bridge

caring@home joins forces with Shannon's Bridge

Shannon's Bridge, via a grant from the Victorian Government's End-of-life Ancillary Service program, will fund the production and distribution of 3,500 caring@home carer packages for community services who care for palliative patients in Victoria. 

This partnership will enable more choice for terminally-ill Victorians who wish to be cared for and to die at home.  

Regional GP's perspective on home-based palliative care
Regional GP's perspective on home-based palliative care

Regional GP's perspective on home-based palliative care

Dr. Hepper writes on her experience with community-based palliative care in regional Victoria, involving carers in the management of breakthrough symptoms and the relevance of the caring@home package for carers and related resources in breaking down barriers to home-based care for terminally-ill people.  

Evaluation of The Just in Case Box project
Evaluation of The Just in Case Box project

Evaluation of The Just in Case Box project

The Just in Case Box (JiCB) was a four-year project implemented as part of hospice@HOME in Tasmania.  Its purpose was to provide equitable access to timely symptom relief for people with a life limiting illness who expressed a preference to die at home.  It formed part of the overall end-of-life plan and included the pre-emptive provision of subcutaneous medicines (recommended by the Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine) and consumables.

Four ways to improve medicines management at the end of life
Four ways to improve medicines management at the end of life

Four ways to improve medicines management at the end of life

Death from acute causes is less common these days, particularly in an economically developed country such as Australia. As such, an expected death resulting from a chronic illness is a reality for many. 

Supporting end-of-life wishes through caring@home
Supporting end-of-life wishes through caring@home

Supporting end-of-life wishes through caring@home

The caring@home project is an important project that will assist in supporting people in the community to live and die in their own homes, ensuring optimal symptom control. Palliative care is a multi-disciplinary approach to care which aims to improve the quality of life for people living with a life-limiting illness, their families and carers. As dying is a normal part of life, it is important for all Australians to have discussions about death and dying and make decisions on the type of care they wish to receive. Palliative Care Australia research has shown that eight in ten Australians think it’s important to talk about their end-of-life wishes however only one in four have actually had the conversation.

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Page last updated 14 March 2019